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Kaiser Permanente Wins Recognition from 2020 Health Care Climate Challenge

April 11, 2018



Solar Panels at Kaiser Permanente Colorado Colorado’s regional offices Solar panel arrays at Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s regional offices in Denver. 

Fifty-two facilities host 25 megawatts of onsite solar generation (with more under construction) in many communities Kaiser Permanente serves and more than 300 electric vehicle charging stations are available at medical and office sites. These are just a couple of ways in which Kaiser Permanente has committed to addressing climate change.

Kaiser Permanente has earned two gold recognitions from the 2020 Health Care Climate Challenge for its efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions and increase the use of renewable energy. It is one of seven health care organizations in North America recognized for its sustainability work in 2017. Since 2008, Kaiser Permanente has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 29 percent while increasing its membership by 24 percent.

“This award underscores the progress Kaiser Permanente is making toward a clean energy future and the example we wish to set, not only in health care but for large organizations across all industries,” said Ramé Hemstreet, vice president of Operations and chief sustainable resources officer for Kaiser Permanente. “Installing clean and cost-effective solar generation at Kaiser Permanente facilities reduces our contribution to climate change and improves the health of our communities.”

The 2020 Health Care Climate Challenge encourages participants to lead the transformation to climate-smart health care by implementing strategies to reduce their climate footprint, developing low-carbon models of care, adapting to a changing climate and advocating for policies to protect the future health of the planet.

Many of the initial participants set mitigation targets to reduce carbon reduction by 30 percent or more by 2020. Currently, the 2020 Challenge has 160 participants that represent the interests of more than 14,000 hospitals and health centers in 24 countries. The 2020 Challenge reviews and assesses data submitted by participants as it relates to the three pillars of the challenge, which are climate mitigation, resiliency and leadership.