Kaiser Permanente Hawaii Green Initiatives Highlight Environmental Benefits This Earth Day

Kaiser Permanente Hawaii has implemented a number of environmental projects that have reduced electricity use, cut energy and water consumption, and kept thousands of pounds of waste out of Hawaii landfills.

Press Release
photo of Kaiser Permanente Hawaii President Mary Ann Barnes, RN, checking out the solar power installation at Mapunapuna Medical Office.
Kaiser Permanente Hawaii President Mary Ann Barnes, RN, checking out the solar power installation at Mapunapuna Medical Office.

HONOLULU — This Earth Day, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii highlights a number of environmental projects implemented over the past several years, which have resulted in more than one type of savings. In addition to reducing its electric bill, the organization cut its energy and water consumption, and saved thousands of pounds of waste from being dumped into Hawaii landfills.

Here’s a roundup of environmentally friendly efforts that Kaiser Permanente Hawaii has been working on:

  • Powered by sunlight: Four active photovoltaic systems installed at Kaiser Permanente Koolau, Mapunapuna and Waipio Medical Offices, and Nanaikeola Clinic, have generated nearly 1.92 million kilowatt-hours since July 2015 — enough energy to power 291 Hawaii homes for an entire year! Solar installation projects at Moanalua Medical Center, and Honolulu and Kona Medical Office are currently in progress.
  • Reduce, reuse, reprocess: From January 2016 through March 2017, more than 12.51 tons of equipment and furniture were reused, reallocated, or reprocessed and sterilized for reuse, diverting more than 12 tons of waste from Hawaii landfills.
  • Improving recycling efforts: Kaiser Permanente Hawaii currently recycles cardboard, confidential documents and agriculture clippings (green waste) to the tune of more than 11 tons each month. Recycling bins on each unit of the Moanalua Medical Center collect cans, bottles, plastic tubing and packaging, paper and mixed cardboard, amounting to an additional 225 pounds of recyclable material per week. The organization uses 100 percent post-consumer recycled paper towels.
  • Cutting water waste: Over the past two years, Kaiser Permanente decreased its water usage by 15.3 percent, from 86.8 gallons per regional square foot to 73.5 gallons. Replacing toilets and faucets with low-flow, water-saving options led to substantial water savings.

Upcoming energy projects include replacing outdated lighting with LEDs at select clinics on Oahu and Maui. LED lighting can reduce energy usage by up to 20 percent in clinics and hospitals, which will help lower total energy usage throughout the region.

In addition, the Kaiser Permanente Kona Medical Office will soon be receiving its LEED Silver certification, joining Kaiser Permanente Koolau Medical Office and a handful of medical buildings in the state to achieve LEED status.

About Kaiser Permanente Hawaii
Kaiser Permanente Hawaii has provided total health to the people of Hawaii for nearly 60 years, with physicians who are members of the Hawaii Permanente Medical Group, the largest multi-specialty physician group practice in the state of Hawaii. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health. Visit kp.org for additional information. Become a fan of good health with Kaiser Permanente Hawaii: Like our page at Facebook.com/KPHawaii and follow @KPHawaii on Twitter.